The ancient art of cormorant fishing in China dates back more than a millennium, and is now becoming obsolete due to more efficient techniques, and overfished waterways.    Grandpa Huang, age 80, and his brother, far left, are the oldest fisherman in their village. They now earn their keep posing for spectators on China’s River Li, in part as a way of preserving history.

The ancient art of cormorant fishing in China dates back more than a millennium, and is now becoming obsolete due to more efficient techniques, and overfished waterways.

Grandpa Huang, age 80, and his brother, far left, are the oldest fisherman in their village. They now earn their keep posing for spectators on China’s River Li, in part as a way of preserving history.

Cormorant_08_24x36-2.JPG
  The ancient art of cormorant fishing in China dates back more than a millennium, and is now becoming obsolete due to more efficient techniques, and overfished waterways.    Grandpa Huang, age 80, and his brother, far left, are the oldest fisherman in their village. They now earn their keep posing for spectators on China’s River Li, in part as a way of preserving history.
Cormorant_08_24x36-2.JPG

The ancient art of cormorant fishing in China dates back more than a millennium, and is now becoming obsolete due to more efficient techniques, and overfished waterways.

Grandpa Huang, age 80, and his brother, far left, are the oldest fisherman in their village. They now earn their keep posing for spectators on China’s River Li, in part as a way of preserving history.

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