The Maasai in Tanzania are a semi-nomadic group whose sustenance relies on cattle. They move with the changing seasons, and to allow the grasses to grow for feeding their livestock.  The Maasai’s access to ancestral grazing territories are now threatened due to globalization land acquisition, luxury safaris, conservation, and climate change.

The Maasai in Tanzania are a semi-nomadic group whose sustenance relies on cattle. They move with the changing seasons, and to allow the grasses to grow for feeding their livestock.

The Maasai’s access to ancestral grazing territories are now threatened due to globalization land acquisition, luxury safaris, conservation, and climate change.

 The Maasai in Tanzania are a semi-nomadic group whose sustenance relies on cattle. They move with the changing seasons, and to allow the grasses to grow for feeding their livestock.

The Maasai in Tanzania are a semi-nomadic group whose sustenance relies on cattle. They move with the changing seasons, and to allow the grasses to grow for feeding their livestock.

 Nomadic Maasai women and children stand outside one of several bomas (or houses) made of mud and branches, where the Maasai live in a communal environment.

Nomadic Maasai women and children stand outside one of several bomas (or houses) made of mud and branches, where the Maasai live in a communal environment.

 Maasai men in colorful woven fabrics at their home in the open bush in Tanzania, Africa.

Maasai men in colorful woven fabrics at their home in the open bush in Tanzania, Africa.

 The Maasai’s access to ancestral grazing territories are said to be threatened due to globalization land acquisition, luxury safaris, conservation, and climate change.

The Maasai’s access to ancestral grazing territories are said to be threatened due to globalization land acquisition, luxury safaris, conservation, and climate change.

 A Maasai woman in Tanzania.

A Maasai woman in Tanzania.

 A woman outside her make shift home near the Ngorongoro Crater in Tanzania.

A woman outside her make shift home near the Ngorongoro Crater in Tanzania.

 Maasai children’s school room made from mud, branches, and cow dung.

Maasai children’s school room made from mud, branches, and cow dung.

 The Maasai in Tanzania are a semi-nomadic group whose sustenance relies on cattle. They move with the changing seasons, and to allow the grasses to grow for feeding their livestock.  The Maasai’s access to ancestral grazing territories are now threatened due to globalization land acquisition, luxury safaris, conservation, and climate change.
 The Maasai in Tanzania are a semi-nomadic group whose sustenance relies on cattle. They move with the changing seasons, and to allow the grasses to grow for feeding their livestock.
 Nomadic Maasai women and children stand outside one of several bomas (or houses) made of mud and branches, where the Maasai live in a communal environment.
 Maasai men in colorful woven fabrics at their home in the open bush in Tanzania, Africa.
 The Maasai’s access to ancestral grazing territories are said to be threatened due to globalization land acquisition, luxury safaris, conservation, and climate change.
 A Maasai woman in Tanzania.
 A woman outside her make shift home near the Ngorongoro Crater in Tanzania.
 Maasai children’s school room made from mud, branches, and cow dung.

The Maasai in Tanzania are a semi-nomadic group whose sustenance relies on cattle. They move with the changing seasons, and to allow the grasses to grow for feeding their livestock.

The Maasai’s access to ancestral grazing territories are now threatened due to globalization land acquisition, luxury safaris, conservation, and climate change.

The Maasai in Tanzania are a semi-nomadic group whose sustenance relies on cattle. They move with the changing seasons, and to allow the grasses to grow for feeding their livestock.

Nomadic Maasai women and children stand outside one of several bomas (or houses) made of mud and branches, where the Maasai live in a communal environment.

Maasai men in colorful woven fabrics at their home in the open bush in Tanzania, Africa.

The Maasai’s access to ancestral grazing territories are said to be threatened due to globalization land acquisition, luxury safaris, conservation, and climate change.

A Maasai woman in Tanzania.

A woman outside her make shift home near the Ngorongoro Crater in Tanzania.

Maasai children’s school room made from mud, branches, and cow dung.

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